The AngFus3 mitogen-activated protein kinase controls hyphal differentiation and secondary metabolism in aspergillus niger.

Bert-Ewald Priegnitz, and Ulrike Brandt, and Khomaizon A K Pahirulzaman,, and Jeroen S Dickschat, and André Fleißner, (2015) The AngFus3 mitogen-activated protein kinase controls hyphal differentiation and secondary metabolism in aspergillus niger. Eukaryotic Cell, 14 (6). pp. 602-615. ISSN 1535-9786

Official URL: http://www.pubfacts.com/detail/25888553/The-AngFus...

Abstract

Adaptation to a changing environment is essential for the survival and propagation of sessile organisms, such as plants or fungi. Filamentous fungi commonly respond to a worsening of their growth conditions by differentiation of asexually or sexually produced spores. The formation of these specialized cell types is, however, also triggered as part of the general life cycle by hyphal age or density. Spores typically serve for dispersal and, therefore, translocation but can also act as resting states to endure times of scarcity. Eukaryotic differentiation in response to environmental and self-derived signals is commonly mediated by three-tiered mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades. Here, we report that the MAP kinase Fus3 of the black mold Aspergillus niger (AngFus3) and its upstream kinase AngSte7 control vegetative spore formation and secondary metabolism. Mutants lacking these kinases are defective in conidium induction in response to hyphal density but are fully competent in starvation-induced sporulation, indicating that conidiation in A. niger is triggered by various independent signals. In addition, the mutants exhibit an altered profile of volatile metabolites and secrete dark pigments into the growth medium, suggesting a dysregulation of the secondary metabolism. By assigning the AngFus3 MAP kinase pathway to the transduction of a potentially self-derived trigger, this work contributes to the unraveling of the intricate signaling networks controlling fungal differentiation. Moreover, our data further support earlier observations that differentiation and secondary metabolism are tightly linked in filamentous fungi.

Item Type: Non-Indexed Article
Deposited By: En. Pahmi Abdullah
Date Deposited: 21 May 2017 06:56
Last Modified: 21 May 2017 06:56
URI: http://umkeprints.umk.edu.my/id/eprint/5261

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item